Chevrolet Volt Hybrid but not Hybrid – A better electric car   Leave a comment

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Any company that invests and creates jobs in America gets my attention. No I was not a business news regular but it is changing. I am really tired of economy being slow and people being scared of being themselves when it comes to spending. So when I learn that GM invested more than $700 million in eight Michigan plants for Volt production I started to look forward for the Chicago Auto Show.

The first look at the car was pleasing but I really lost my heart to it when I saw the detail of inside of the car. The touch of green is not just artistic but quite appropriate for this supper green car. The gear stick, the panels every thing is so SiFi.

But then I find out that engine is all electric and gas in regular tank is used to generate electricity and same all electric engine keeps on going even when battery is depleted. So though it has battery and gas tank but unlike other hybrid vehicles it doesn’t switch to regular engine when battery is gone. So even when it is using gas the engine is electric. Eight-year/100,000-mile warranty on lithium-ion battery pack show reliability of battery. Unlike cell phone it won’t start dying on you in six months. Five years of OnStar Directions and Connections service, including Automatic Crash Response, stolen vehicle assistance and connected navigation. For within the city trips I don’t have to go to the gas station. It can be locked, unlocked and started to cool or warm it before you get in through MyVolt.com. Humm no more lost keys, lock outs. Here goes my brain to the car too.

After test ride on the Auto show trails the quietness of the car amazed me. There is so noise in the world a quitter car is better. So when I came out of the car I really wanted to hug the car. What I can say I want to hug anything and everything i like.

On 120V it takes about 10-12 hours to charge the battery fully. But on 240V it is cut down to about 4hr. I think getting a converter to use 240V to charge the vehicle is really a good idea.

Speed up to 100 mph, full charge of battery gives 25 – 50 miles, in city, depending on terrain, driving technique, temperature and battery age. When the Volt’s battery runs low, a gas engine seamlessly engages to extend the driving range. This eliminates the worry of being stranded by a depleted battery. As long as you stop to refuel, you can drive the Volt like a traditional car until you can stop to plug in and re-charge the battery.

Chevrolet estimates that drivers who commute 60 miles a day (more than 21,000 miles per year) could save about 550 gallons of gasoline annually (compared to a similar size vehicle that averages 30 mpg).

So now you all are perhaps wondering what about the cost of the electricity? So here we go:

At 10 cents per kilowatt hour, Chevrolet estimates that an electrically driven mile in a Volt will cost about one-sixth compared to a conventional gasoline vehicle. It is estimated that it will cost about two cents per mile to drive electrically vs. 12 cents using gasoline priced at $3.60 per gallon. Most Chevrolet Volts are likely to be charged off-peak in the evening or overnight when electricity consumption is lower, potentially further reducing the cost of recharging. Charging the Volt about once daily will consume less electric energy annually than the average home’s refrigerator and freezer units.

Here is the highlight of all the info charging the Volt’s battery once per day from empty to full will cost about $1.50, or about the cost of a bottle of water. (Please note all the figures are provided by GM and are accurate at the time of this publication). Question is if installing the solar panel for charging the car a good idea?

I honestly think Volt has duly won 2011 North American Car of the Year award.

Keep in touch with volt here http://www.facebook.com/chevroletvolt

If you buy the car because you read my article please leave me some comments.

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